Summer Presentations & Critiques

Presentations

60 second Praxis Presentation
Very brief intro to you and your work that takes place on the first day of the summer residency.

30 min Presentation
Everyone will have a 30 minute slot to present and receive feedback on their work during the summer residency. Presentations usually run in the afternoons after workshops. Everyone is expected to attend all presentations.

The structure follows the form: 15 minutes presentation followed by 15 minute feedback.

Generally, the 15 minutes presentation is divided between showing previous work and presenting the project plan for the year ahead. During feedback the group will offer critique, ideas and advice for your project, as well as suggestions for texts, films and other resources. You can choose to close your presentation by asking specific questions of the group to focus their feedback and reference suggestions, or by simply opening the floor.

See advice for critiques here: Critique Support

Please have a look at your fellow students’ blogs in the student directory if you are not familiar with everyone’s work. This is especially helpful for time-based work where there will only be time to view two or three minutes of work during presentations. It’s also a good idea to puta link at the top of your blog with the work you want previewed.

 

Offsite Crit Group Meeting

Towards the end of the residency you will meet with your offsite critique group. This is the group that you will do written critiques (Fall semester) and Skype critiques (Spring semester) with throughout the year. You will be assigned a group by administration. Your pre-offsite crit group meetings are free form. Let your crit leaders know how you would like to do yours. If there are particular questions or issues you want addressed in your work, be sure to let your group know.

More information can be found here: Offsite Critique Group 

 

Dissemination and Dialogues

MFA students in their third and final summer will present their MFA Project. Called dissemination—appropriately devised by each student—should be a considered, thoughtful and articulate presentation of their project. The form this takes is up to each student and should be understood as what is most appropriate to their ideas, intentions and media.  

The MFA Dialogue format is a wonderful opportunity for each student group to interpret their own and their peers work and projects, and subsequently form small groups centered on common themes, media, actions that each of the small groups coalesce around. 

If you believe the dissemination of your project is best suited to other venues or formats you should discuss these ideas with your advisory teams and articulate the context on your Process Blog. Consider where and how to best achieve your goals and then present these either before or during the summer residency and present a part of your project in dialogue at residency as well. 

We encourage you to embrace and think of this as an exciting and challenging occasion: to work in the gap between artist and curator;  to contextualize your work within that of your community and peers and to generate dialogue: around ideas, terrain, experience, sharing and exploration; a celebration of ideas, people, media andsustainable diversity.

Transart will support these dialogues with space and time at residency, residency venue(s), tech and logistical support, announcements and social media and photographic documentation of events. If you want documentation of your own project you should organizethis individually or in your group.