Presentations & Critiques

Presentations

Generally presentation is divided between showing previous work (for context) and presenting the project plan for the year ahead. You should interpret this in a way that will best showcase your research and in a form that best describes what you do. Some simple questions to consider: what is the ‘story’ you want to tell? who is your audience? how will you effectively tell your story to this audience to include them and to highlight your question/s and your passion?

It is important that you review your fellow students’ blogs (linked in the student directory) to familiarise yourself with everyone’s work. This is especially helpful for time-based work where there will be limited time to view only a few minutes of work during presentations. It’s also a good idea to add a link to the work you want previewed at the top of your blog.

Note: everyone is expected to attend all presentations—these are our best way of knowing, understanding and actively participating in each others practices.

60-120 second Praxis Presentation
Very brief intro to you and your work that takes place on the first day of the summer residency.

PechaKucha Style Presentations (traditionally 20 slides shown for 20 seconds each) 
This style of presentations concise and fast-paced. The number of slides may vary, format open but visuals must be a Keynote (or Ppt) slideshow set on automatic timer (to the agreed upon length). Include an overview of your praxis, topics and themes; describe proposed or current project (with updates if in-process). Reference influences, explain why this project or thesis is important to your praxis/you. Full group. You will have time to describe what kind of feedback you are looking for and ask questions in your critique groups. 

Milestone Presentation
MFA and PhD’s completing a milestone (PhD: candidature and final, MFA completing year one and final) have 30-60 minute slots to present and receive feedback on their work during the summer residency. Time is divided equally to present and Q+A. 
Your presentation form should be relevant to the project or thesis itself.

Critique Groups (on-site)
You should interpret this in a way that will best showcase your research and in a form that best describes what you do. You don’t need to present your project again as you will have done this in the PechaKucha. Take a short time to describe what kind of feedback you are looking for and ask questions in your critique groups. 

During feedback the group will offer critique, ideas and advice for your project, as well as suggestions for texts, films and other resources. You can choose to close your presentation by asking specific questions of the group to focus their feedback and reference suggestions, or by simply opening the floor. Time will be divided equally among participants. 

Please refrain from offering simple complimentary comments such as “I like what you are doing”. While it is comforting to hear these they do not provide critical ideas or help challenge and clarify your work and ideas. You can always pass on any compliments after presentation. See advice for critiques here: Critique Support